Gerardus Kelleger GERARDUS PRESS gewk1.com
Read this first before using: Web side of www.gewk1.com see Gerardus press for details.
 
 
Notifications URGENT information
to read first, urgent
 
 
32586 The first wave
Circassians
 
 
32587 chips of the first creation by man
Bible, Torah, Quran
 
 
32589 The US/UK want to rule the world.
O, what a nasty web we weave
 
 
32590 Ignored by Israel, US/UK.
Thou shall not kill
 
 
32592 from which angle you look at it
It is a creators story
 
 
32596 Lemuria
No: 3
 
 
32599 and moraly corrupt, NATO
USA led
 
 
32606 web we weave in Belarus
What a terrible
 
 
32608 in a changing world
Epifanie
 
 
32610 The scientists
The bible according to
 
 
32611 USA army extention
NATO the
 
 
32613 A BRAVE CONFESSION
Faith
 
 
32614 Free speech
We have a God given
 
 
32615 Into the light.
From the darkness
 
 
32616 Evolution
Creation or
 
 
32617 for Christ
All for the love
 
 
32618 or just a little bounce
Big Bang
 
 
32618 The return
Davids Message
 
 
32619 to be learned
A lessen
 
 
32620 The rule of Thump
Billions of death or,
 
 
32621 the wind blows
The lord
 
 
32622 suffering at the hand of God
All those who do not believe
 
 
32623 In the beginning
Homophobia
 
 
32624 Judiasm
The three branches
 
 
32625 re-told
An Old story
 
 
32626 A humanist
John Calvin
 
 
32627 and blamed on others.
Gods beginning. How to tell a story
 
 
32628 The foundation of
History
 
 
32629 Ulrich Zwingly
The history of
 
 
32630 The Messiah
Jesus
 
 
32631 What have we learne from
History
 
 
32632 non-belief
The atracted alternative
 
 
32633 a curious event
Viewing
 
 
32634 The real view.
Atheism,
 
 
32635 But are they?
Remember the laws of God
 
 
32636 God
We do acknowledge
 
 
32637 Adam the first man
The Hebrew creation
 
 
32638 Even as a humble Christian
U are needed.
 
 
32639 warning
A danger
 
 
32640 Only the smell of Greed, power and Control count.
For the West
 
 
32641 the prophets
Abraham
 
 
32642 an atrachted alternative
Believe,
 
 
32643 Jewish people
A invention
 
 
32644 AN INTELECTUAL DESIGNER
Was there really?
 
 
32645 in endless fear
Looking at it
 
 
32646 Ararat
A mountain to climb
 
 
32647 A reality?
A floating child
 
 
32648 Gods beginning
A new beginning
 
 
32649 a holy wonder
admiration
 
 
32650 your own windows
When you throw in,
 
 
32651 Atheists the religion
A clear view on,
 
 
32652 on a planet full of water
Not a drop to drink
 
 
32653 Christians
When Christians stand against
 
 
32654 John Calvin
A view at
 
 
32655 not answered
The questions
 
 
32656 WHEN WE DO NOT HEED
A WARNING
 
 
32657 on the warpath. no1
America
 
 
32658 war path. no2
America again on the
 
 
32659 of the Final words
The first
 
 
32660 Christianity
The basics of fear
 
 
32661 a gods creation
Abraham
 
 
32662 entslaving countries
A real American game
 
 
32663 or maybe in another million of years
The end is near
 
 
32664 the fears of Christianity
The final word
 
 
32665 Be good of cheers
A ship sailed
 
 
32666 a good spirit
Gods fear
 
 
32667 A good home
For a child
 
 
32668 The holy word
A close view
 
 
32669 Supernational
Viewing the
 
 
32670 religions
The Abrahamic
 
 
32671 the Abrahamic religions
Gay and
 
 
32672 Where they or.......
The fallen angels
 
 
32676 The UN abolished
Israel on the war path wants......
 
 
32768 of torture
The pleasure
 
 

32628 The foundation of

History that lays the foundation for genuine citizenship returns, in one sense, to the essential uses of the study of the past. History provides data about the emergence of national institutions, problems, and values—it's the only significant storehouse of such data available. It offers evidence also about how nations have interacted with other societies, providing international and comparative perspectives essential for responsible citizenship. Further, studying history helps us understand how recent, current, and prospective changes that affect the lives of citizens are emerging or may emerge and what causes are involved. More important, studying history encourages habits of mind that are vital for responsible public behavior, whether as a national or community leader, an informed voter, a petitioner, or a simple observer.

What does a well-trained student of history, schooled to work on past materials and on case studies in social change, learn how to do? The list is manageable, but it contains several overlapping categories.

The study of history builds experience in dealing with and assessing various kinds of evidence—the sorts of evidence historians use in shaping the most accurate pictures of the past that they can. Learning how to interpret the statements of past political leaders—one kind of evidence—helps form the capacity to distinguish between the objective and the self-serving among statements made by present-day political leaders. Learning how to combine different kinds of evidence—public statements, private records, numerical data, visual materials—develops the ability to make coherent arguments based on a variety of data. This skill can also be applied to information encountered in everyday life.

Learning history means gaining some skill in sorting through diverse, often conflicting interpretations. Understanding how societies work—the central goal of historical study—is inherently imprecise, and the same certainly holds true for understanding what is going on in the present day. Learning how to identify and evaluate conflicting interpretations is an essential citizenship skill for which history, as an often-contested laboratory of human experience, provides training.

This is one area in which the full benefits of historical study sometimes clash with the narrower uses of the past to construct identity. Experience in examining past situations provides a constructively critical sense that can be applied to partisan claims about the glories of national or group identity. The study of history in no sense undermines loyalty or commitment, but it does teach the need for assessing arguments, and it provides opportunities to engage in debate and achieve perspective.

Experience in assessing past examples of change is vital to understanding change in society today—it's an essential skill in what we are regularly told is our "ever-changing world." Analysis of change means developing some capacity for determining the magnitude and significance of change, for some changes are more fundamental than others are.

Comparing particular changes to relevant examples from the past helps students of history develop this capacity. The ability to identify the continuities that always accompany even the most dramatic changes also comes from studying history, as does the skill to determine probable causes of change. Learning history helps one figure out, for example, if one main factor—such as a technological innovation or some deliberate new policy—accounts for a change or whether, as is more commonly the case, a number of factors combine to generate the actual change that occurs.

Historical study, in sum, is crucial to the promotion of that elusive creature, the well-informed citizen. It provides basic factual information about the background of our political institutions and about the values and problems that affect our social well-being. It also contributes to our capacity to use evidence, assess interpretations, and analyze change and continuities. No one can ever quite deal with the present as the historian deals with the past—we lack the perspective for this feat; but we can move in this direction by applying historical habits of mind, and we will function as better citizens in the process.

History is useful for work. Its study helps create good businesspeople, professionals, and political leaders. The number of explicit professional jobs for historians is considerable, but most people who study history do not become professional historians. Professional historians teach at various levels, work in museums and media centers, do historical research for businesses or public agencies, or participate in the growing number of historical consultancies. These categories are important—indeed vital—to keep the basic enterprise of history going, but most people who study history use their training for broader professional purposes. Students of history find their experience directly relevant to jobs in a variety of careers as well as to further study in fields like law and public administration. Employers often deliberately seek students with the kinds of capacities historical study promotes.

The reasons are not hard to identify: students of history acquire, by studying different phases of the past and different societies in the past, a broad perspective that gives them the range and flexibility required in many work situations. They develop research skills, the ability to find and evaluate sources of information, and the means to identify and evaluate diverse interpretations. Work in history also improves basic writing and speaking skills and is directly relevant to many of the analytical requirements in the public and private sectors, where the capacity to identify, assess, and explain trends is essential. Historical study is unquestionably an asset for a variety of work and professional situations, even though it does not, for most students, lead as directly to a particular job slot, as do some technical fields.

But history particularly prepares students for the long haul in their careers, its qualities helping adaptation and advancement beyond entry-level employment. There is no denying that in our society many people who are drawn to historical study worry about relevance. In our changing economy, there is concern about job futures in most fields. Historical training is not, however, an indulgence; it applies directly to many careers and can clearly help us in our working lives.

 

Why study history? The answer is because we virtually must, to gain access to the laboratory of human experience. When we study it reasonably well, and so acquire some usable habits of mind, as well as some basic data about the forces that affect our own lives, we emerge with relevant skills and an enhanced capacity for informed citizenship, critical thinking, and simple awareness. The uses of history are varied. Studying history can help us develop some literally "salvable" skills, but its study must not be pinned down to the narrowest utilitarianism. Some history—that confined to personal recollections about changes and continuities in the immediate environment—is essential to function beyond childhood. Some history depends on personal taste, where one finds beauty, the joy of discovery, or intellectual challenge. Between the inescapable minimum and the pleasure of deep commitment comes the history that, through cumulative skill in interpreting the unfolding human record, provides a real grasp of how the world works.

 

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