Gerardus Kelleger GERARDUS PRESS gewk1.com
Read this first before using: Web side of www.gewk1.com see Gerardus press for details.
 
 
Notifications URGENT information
to read first, urgent
 
 
32495 converted by the media
The bible stories
 
 
32496 Aut Nihil
Aut Ceasar
 
 
32497 or just a simple flooding
Noah's ark
 
 
32498 The artificial created anti-Semitism
Israel
 
 
32499 proof later
Believing first
 
 
32500 or just faith.....
An addiction
 
 
32501 Bestowed upon us by God
The manner of love
 
 
32502 of all.....
The saviour
 
 
32503 Who is fooling who
The main question
 
 
32504 But who is doubtingh the creation
Some doubt
 
 
32505 will He return to us.....
2000 years ago
 
 
32506 The story of the Ukraine
Bandera the so admired killer in WW2 by the EU.
 
 
32507 With the devil on your side
Who can fail.....
 
 
32508 It grows.
Belief is like a tree
 
 
32509 I will presch........
Being the least of all saints
 
 
32510 The bibles answers
Who can.......
 
 
32511 Antique books.
Killing off a market
 
 
32512 A path for us.....
God has laid out
 
 
32513 You can move mountains.
If you belief
 
 
32514 without a church
Spreading the word
 
 
32515 On heaven and Earth
Praising the Lord
 
 
32516 or are they not?
Are they?
 
 
32517 Let us pray.....
When we say.....
 
 
32518 wrote those words?
Did Mordecai
 
 
32519 Without Jesus?
Would the Hebrew be known
 
 
32520 Any real proof of Jesus?
But is there any?
 
 
32521 a belief?
Atheism
 
 
32522 Immunity
A system
 
 
32523 Revive thy work
Oh Lord
 
 
32524 What to do with him
A masn called Christ
 
 
32525 Spirits, deities and gods
first three pages
 
 
32526 Are the churches getting the hungry
To the table...
 
 
32527 Called Jesus.
What tyo do with a man
 
 
32528 The mediator
Christ.....
 
 
32529 Spirits, Deities, Gods
second part
 
 
32530 I should do.
What is it....
 
 
32531 It rules religion
Money
 
 
32532 full of self control
See a man
 
 
32533 Spirits, Deitie, Gods
part four
 
 
32534 In the hand of God
We are sinners
 
 
32535 Are you?
Iam a Christian
 
 
32536 The microben
Human health
 
 
32537 Where is my strenght
Heavenly father
 
 
32538 Spirits, Deities, Gods
Part four
 
 
32539 He shall help us
Do not hesitate
 
 
32540 Views....
Paternostal
 
 
32541 Microbal inflamation
Maladaption of the body
 
 
32542 of the feet
The washing.....
 
 
32543 Spitits, Deities, Gods
Part five
 
 
32544 from gopfor wood
Make yourself an ark
 
 
32545 What is life to you,
Our life,
 
 
32546 Use it well
Time is short,
 
 
32547 When old passes away
All becomes new
 
 
32548 Spirits, Deities, Gods
part Six
 
 
32549 His love will remove it.
Hatred?
 
 
32550 It stirs up your love
His love
 
 
32551 The holy spit works.
Through providence
 
 
32552 Hell for you.
Hell will be.....
 
 
32553 Spirits, Deities, Gods
part seven
 
 
32554 Rejoice.......
All the people......
 
 
32555 The killing of Floyd
The previous history of
 
 
32556 Language
streken Frysk
 
 
32557 Karaites
The story
 
 
32558 God
The concurend
 
 
32559 Atheist
Part two
 
 
32560 McCarthyism
A look in the past
 
 
32561 a view of God
The Western countries
 
 
32562 It's burning
The Negev....
 
 

32543 Spitits, Deities, Gods

The Zayit Stone does not in itself tell us when the Bible was written and collated, but it gives us our first glimpse of the language that produced it. And, by tracking the stylistic development of that language down the centuries, and cross-referencing it with biblical text, historians have been able to rule out the single-author hypotheses, concluding instead that it was written by waves of scribes during the first millennium BC. But are they the truth?

Some parts, such as the early chapters of Genesis, are myth or legend, rather than history. But parts of Samuel, Kings, Ezra and Nehemiah describe events broadly known also from Assyrian or Persian sources. For example, Jehu, king of Israel in the ninth century BC, appears on an Assyrian monument, the Black Obelisk, doing obeisance to the Assyrian king. From about the eighth century BC onwards, the Old Testament contains some real historiography, even though it may not all be accurate. Much of the Old Testament is about seeing God at work in human history rather than in accurately recording the detail, and sometimes we exaggerate the importance of historical accuracy. The Old Testament is not a work of fiction, but nor is it a modern piece of history-writing.

The question is does archaeology support the bible. To a very limited extent. It gives us a context within which the Old Testament makes sense, but it doesn’t confirm a lot of the details. It mustn’t be forgotten that archaeology has also yielded vast numbers of documents from the ancient near-east, such as Assyrian and Babylonian annals, which illuminate the Old Testament world.

The scribes are never described in detail in the Old Testament itself, but analogies with Egypt and Mesopotamia make it clear that there must have been a scribal class, probably attached as civil servants to the temple in Jerusalem or the royal court. After the exile of the Jewish people in Babylon in the sixth century BC, scribes gradually turned into religious teachers, as we find them in the New Testament.

Probably during the first century BC, though parts of it were certainly regarded as Holy Scripture much earlier than that. But the collection is a work of early Judaism. It should be remembered that for a long time it was a collection of individual scrolls, not a single book between two covers.

Sometime between November 1946 and February 1947, a Bedouin shepherd threw a stone into a cave at Wadi Qumran, near the Dead Sea. When he heard something crack he headed inside to investigate. What he found has been described by the Smithsonian Institute as “the most important religious texts in the Western world”.

What the shepherd had chanced upon were the Dead Sea Scrolls, more than 800 documents of animal skin and papyrus, stored in clay jars for safe keeping. Among the texts are fragments of every book of the Old Testament, except the Book of Esher, along with a collection of previously unknown hymns and a copy of the Ten Commandments. Some parts, such as the early chapters of Genesis, are myth or legend, rather than history. But parts of Samuel, Kings, Ezra and Nehemiah describe events broadly known also from Assyrian or Persian sources. For example, Jehu, king of Israel in the ninth century BC, appears on an Assyrian monument, the Black Obelisk, doing obeisance to the Assyrian king.

From about the eighth century BC onwards, the Old Testament contains some real historiography, even though it may not all be accurate. Much of the Old Testament is about seeing God at work in human history rather than in accurately recording the detail, and sometimes we exaggerate the importance of historical accuracy. The Old Testament is not a work of fiction, but nor is it a modern piece of history-writing. It gives us a context within which the Old Testament makes sense, but it doesn’t confirm a lot of the details. It mustn’t be forgotten that archaeology has also yielded vast numbers of documents from the ancient near-east, such as Assyrian and Babylonian annals, which illuminate the Old Testament world.

But what really makes the scrolls special is their age. They were written between around 200 BC and the middle decades of the first century AD, written a 600 years later then the first books of the bible. So here is how the story did start:

One day in West Asia man stood up tired from the long journey from Uratu via Harran and down the rivers to Beersheba where they were halted by the desert. They could not go further and he thought any place is as good as another and decided to stay. The problem in those days as such a situation would be today is how to tell it to the others. He had a novel idea and said I just had a word with God and he told that all the land as far as we can see in now mine, please do not try to do that where you live and saying this you would be arrested and sent to a mental institution. But when the wars against the Armenians around Lake Van (In ancient times, successive Mesopotamian peoples regarded the mountains as sacred, but they were also wary of the fierce, local inhabitants. The Sumerians, Acadians, and Assyrians each believed that Mt. Ararat was not only the home of their gods, but also the source of their civilizations, as the waters of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers flowed downwards from the mountain to fertilize the lands adjacent to their cities and settlements. Assyrian texts, in particular, praise the holiness and majesty of the mountains, describing them as a place where “heavenly birds cannot reach.”

Mesopotamians, however, also associated the mountains with the fierce tribes that inhabited Mt. Ararat’s slopes; regularly, they raided Mesopotamian villages and settlements. Another perceived danger associated with Mt. Ararat was that of disastrous flooding. Sumerians, Acadians, and Babylonians each had their own flood account, but they all in turn referenced the Mountains of Ararat as the place in which their respective heroes found refuge after surviving torrential rains and perilous waters. An ancient Acadian tale from the 3rd millennium BCE delineates the exploits of a man called “Utnapishti” who became immortal and survived a catastrophic flood by landing his vessel upon the tallest mountains in the north of his country. Gilgamesh, the celebrated Sumerian hero, reached a northerly mountain called “Mashu,” which was the location through which the sun rose and set every day.

The flood tabled of Gilgamesh of which the Hebrew tribe got there Flood story.

Ancient Armenians called the mountain “Azatn Masis,” which meant “holy” and “free” in the Old Armenian language. Kajs, which were guardian spirits of royal and noble families, dwelled on Greater Ararat. Pagan Armenians found it taboo to scale the mountains as they believed, much like the Sumerians, that Mt. Ararat was the place where the sun came to rest during the night. was destroying people and live hoods, one group went West and ended up in Harran, others went south and East even so far as Baluchistan.

BUT, in that time 4000 years ago they took it for what it was and did believe him. This elderly but still rather astonishingly weird gentleman then said to his son come on we go to take a walk onto the hill to make a sacrifice you carry the wood, I just take the knife. However, the influence of the wine did show that this silly old man had actual murder in mind. And as all killers throughout the history of mankind he had an excuse, God told him. Now that on itself calls many questions. As the bible states nobody had see the face of God as that would mean his death. But here a voice tells the man to kill his son and him, without questions or hesitation follow the orders from someone who said he was God without proven it.

 

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